FAQs for divorce gavel image
 

Alimony and child support typically tend to make up some of the more combative issues in divorce cases.  Many people wonder how the income(s) that once supported a single household will stretch to support two.  Issues of finances vary from case to case, which makes it all the more important that you are honest with your lawyer about your financial situation.  The court will take such issues into consideration when deciding amounts for child support and alimony.

In determining the amount of child support owed, Georgia law takes into account the combined income of both parents along with the number of children being supported.  A child support obligation “table” is used to determine the amount of child support to be paid or received.  Because the proper amount is carefully calculated, it is essential that the courts have accurate information regarding each spouse’s income and earning potential.  For additional information about the topic please refer to our library of Child Support Resources.

Alimony Requirements in the State of Georgia

Unlike child support, Georgia has no state requirements for alimony.  In general, it is intended to take into account the contributions of a spouse who has cared for the children of supported the careers of their working spouse.  Alimony is not a right, but in certain situations it can be awarded, either over time or in a lump sum after the divorce.  In order to determine the eligibility of a spouse to receive alimony, the court will consider the needs, income, and assets of each spouse.  Typically, alimony is not awarded in situations where both spouses worked during the marriage and can support themselves.   For more about alimony in the state of Georgia please visit our section on Alimony and Spousal Support.

Whether you feel as you are deserving of such support payments, or think that your ex-spouse is unduly asking for them, it is always a benefit to have an experienced Family Law Attorney on your side.

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